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Satipatthana Sutta translated by Analayo

posted Jul 6, 2013, 10:49 PM by Sung Yang   [ updated Jul 6, 2013, 10:49 PM ]
Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was living in the Kuru 
country at a town of the Kurus named Karnmasadhamma. There he 
addressed the monks thus: "Monks." "Venerable sir/' they replied. The 
Blessed One said this:

[DIRECT PATH]
"Monks, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the sur­
mounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of dukkha and 
discon ten t, for acquiring the true method, for the realization of Nibbana, 
namely, the four satipafihanas.

[DEFINITION]
"What are the four? Here, monks, in regard to the body a monk abides con­
templating the body, diligent, clearly knowing, and mindful, free from de­
sires and discontent in regard to the world. In regard to feelings he abides 
contemplating feelings, diligent, clearly knowing, and mindful, free from 
desires and discontent in regard to the world. In regard to the mind he 
abides contemplating the mind, diligent, clearly knowing, and mindful,


phlegm, pus, bloody sweat, fat, tears, grease, spittle, snot, oil of the joints, 
and urine.'
"Just as though there were a bag with an opening at both ends full of 
many sorts of grain, such as hill rice, red rice, beans, peas, millet, and white 
rice, and a man with good eyes were to open it and review it thus: 'this is hill 
rice, this is red rice, these are beans, these are peas, this is millet, this is white 
rice'; so too he reviews this same body...* {continue as above).

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, In regard to the body he abides contemplating the body inter­
nally ... externally ... both internally and externally. He abides contemplat­
ing the nature of arising ... of passing away ... of both arising and passing 
away in the body. Mindfulness that'there is a body' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is 
how in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body.

[ELEMENTS]
"Again, monks, he reviews this same body, however it is placed, however 
disposed, as consisting of elements thus: 'in this body there are the earth 
element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element'.
"Just as though a skilled butcher or his apprentice had killed a cow and 
was seated at a crossroads with it cut up into pieces; so too he reviews this 
same body.,., (continue as above).

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body inter­
nally ... externally ... both internally and externally. He abides contemplat­
ing the nature of arising ... of passing away ... of both arising and passing 
away in the body. Mindfulness that 'there is a body' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is 
how in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body.

[CORPSE IN DECAY]
"Again, monks, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel 
ground —  one, two, or three days dead, bloated, livid, and oozing matter ...

being devoured by crows, hawks, vultures, dogs, jackals, or various kinds of 
worms ... a skeleton with flesh and blood, held together with sinews ... a 
fleshless skeleton smeared with blood, held together with sinews ... a skele­
ton without flesh and blood, held together with sinews ... disconnected 
bones scattered in all directions ... bones bleached white, the colour of 
shells ... bones heaped up, more than a year old ... bones rotten and crum­
bling to dust -  he compares this same body with it thus: "this body too is of 
the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate."

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body inter­
nally ... externally ... both internally and externally. He abides contemplat­
ing the nature of arising ... of passing away 
of both arising and passing 
away in the body. Mindfulness that 'there is a body' is established in him to 
the extent necessary foT bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is 
how in regard to the body he abides contemplating the body.

[FEELINGS]
"And how, monks, does he in regard to feelings abide contemplating 
feelings?
"Here, when feeling a pleasant feeling, he knows 'I feel a pleasant feel- 
ing'; when feeling an unpleasant feeling, he knows 'I feel an unpleasant 
feeling'; when feeling a neutral feeling, he knows 'I feel a neutral feeling/
"When feeling a worldly pleasant feeling, he knows "I feel a worldly 
pleasant feeling'; when feeling an unworldly pleasant feeling, he knows '1 
feel an unworldly pleasant feeling'; when feeling a worldly unpleasant feel­
ing, he knows 'I feel a worldly unpleasant feeling'; when feeling an un­
worldly unpleasant feeling, he knows '1 feel an unworldly unpleasant 
feeling'; when feeling a worldly neutral feeling, he knows 'I feel a worldly 
neutral feeling'; when feeling an unworldly neutral feeling, he knows 'I feel 
an unworldly neutral feeling/


[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to feelings he abides contemplating feelings inter­
nally 
externally 
internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ... of passing away , of both arising and passing away 
in feelings. Mindfulness that 'there is feeling' is established in him to the ex­
tent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And he 
abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world.
"That is how in regard to feelings he abides contemplating feelings.

[MIND]
"And how, monks, does he in regard to the mind abide contemplating the 
mind?
"Here he knows a lustful mind to be 'lustful', and a mind without lust to 
be 'without lust'; he knows an angry mind to be 'angry', and a mind without 
anger to be "without anger'; he knows a deluded mind to be'deluded', and a 
mind without delusion to be 'without delusion'; he knows a contracted 
mind to be 'contracted', and a distracted mind to be 'distracted'; he knows a 
great mind to be 'great', and a narrow mind to be 'narrow'; he knows a 
surpassable mind to be 'surpassable', and an unsurpassable mind to be 
"unsurpassable'; he knows a concentrated mind to be 'concentrated', and an 
unconcentrated mind to be 'unconcentrated'; he knows a liberated mind to 
be 'liberated', and an unliberated mind to be 'unliberated.'

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to the mind he abides contemplating the mind inter­
nally ... externally 
internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ... of passing away ... of both arising and passing away 
in regard to the mind. Mindfulness that 'there is a mind' is established in 
him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindful­
ness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. 
"That is how in regard to the mind he abides contemplating the mind*

[HINDRANCES]
"And how, monks, does he in regard to dhammas abide contemplating 
dhammas? Here in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the five hindrances. And how does he in regard to dhammas abide 
contemplating dhammas in terms of the five hindrances?

"If sensual desire is present in him, he knows 'there is sensual desire in 
me'; if sensual desire is not present in him, he knows 'there is no sensual de­
sire in me'; and he knows how unarisen sensual desire can arise, how arisen 
sensual desire can be removed, and how a future arising of the removed 
sensual desire can be prevented.
"If aversion is present in. him, he knows 'there is aversion in me'; if aver­
sion is not present in him, he knows 'there is no aversion in me'; and he 
knows how unarisen aversion can arise, how arisen aversion can be re­
moved, and how a future arising of the removed aversion can be prevented.
"If sloth-and-torpor is present in him, he knows 'there is sloth-and- 
torpor in me'; if sloth-and-torpor is not present in him, he knows 'there is no 
sloth-and-torpor in me'; and he knows how unarisen sloth-and-torpor can 
arise, how arisen sloth-and-torpor can be removed, and how a future aris­
ing of the removed sloth-and-torpor can be prevented.
"If restlessness-and-worry is present in him, he knows 'there is restless- 
ness-and-worry in me'; if restlessness-and-worry is not present in him, he 
knows 'there is no restlessness-and-worry in me'; and he knows how un- 
arisen restlessness-and-worry can arise, how arisen restlessness-and-worry 
can be removed, and how a future arising of the removed restlessness- 
and-worry can be prevented.
"If doubt is present in him, he knows 'there is doubt in me'; if doubt is not 
present in him, he knows 'there is no doubt in me'; and he knows how 
unarisen doubt can arise, how arisen doubt can be removed/ and how a 
future arising of the removed doubt can be prevented-

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas inter­
nally 
externally 
internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ... of passing away ... of both arising and passing away 
in dha?nmas. Mindfulness that 'there are dhammas' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world,
"That is how in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the five hindrances.

[AGGREGATES]
"Again, monks, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the five aggregates of clinging. And how does he in regard to

dhammas abide contemplating dhammas in terms of the five aggregates of 
clinging?
Here he knows, 'such is materia] form, such its arising, such its passing 
away; such is feeling, such its arising, such its passing away; such is cogni­
tion, such its arising, such its passing away; such are volitions, such their 
arising, such their passing away; such is consciousness, such its arising, 
such its passing away/
[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas inter­
nally ... externally 
internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ... of passing aw ay... of both arising and passing away 
in dhammas♦  Mindfulness that 'there are dhammas' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world.
"That is how in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the five aggregates of clinging.

[SENSE-SPHERESJ
"Again, monks, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the six internal and external sense-spheres. And how does he in re­
gard to dhammas abide contemplating dhammas in terms of the six internal 
and external sens e-spheres?
"Here he knows the eye, he knows forms, and he knows the fetter that 
arises dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter can 
arise, how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of the 
removed fetter can be prevented.
"He knows the ear, he knows sounds, and he knows the fetter that arises 
dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter can arise, 
how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of the re­
moved fetter can be prevented.
"He knows the nose, he knows odours, and he knows the fetter that arises 
dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter can arise, 
how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of the re­
moved fetter can be prevented.
"He knows the tongue, he knows flavours, and he knows the fetter that 
arises dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter can 
arise, how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of the


removed fetter can be prevented.
"He knows the body, he knows tangibles, and he knows the fetter that 
arises dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter can 
arise, how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of the 
removed fetteT can be prevented,
"He knows the mind, he knows mind-objects, and he knows the fetter 
that arises dependent on both, and he also knows how an unarisen fetter 
can arise, how an arisen fetter can be removed, and how a future arising of 
the removed fetter can be prevented.
[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to dhammas he abides con temp) ating dhammas inter­
nally 
externally 
internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising... of passing away .,, of both arising and passing away 
in dhammas. Mindfulness that 'there are dhammas' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world,
"That is how in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the six internal and external sense-spheres.

[AWAKENING FACTORS]
"Again, monks, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the seven awakening factors. And how does he in regard to 
dhammas abide contemplating dhammas in terms of the seven awakening 
factors?
"Here, if the mindfulness awakening factor is present in him, he knows 
'there is the mindfulness awakening factor in me'; if the mindfulness awak­
ening factor is not present in him, he knows 'there is no mindfulness awak­
ening factor in me'; he knows how the unarisen mindfulness awakening 
factor can arise, and how the arisen mindfulness awakening factor can be 
perfected by development.
"If the investigation-of-d/?rt mmas awakening factor is present in him, he 
knows 'there is the investigation-of-d/w*»t»tfls awakening factor in me'; if the 
investiga tion-o£-dhammas awakening factor is not present in him, he knows 
'there is no investigation-oi-dhammas awakening factor in me'; he knows 
how the unarisen investigation-oi-dhammas awakening factor can arise, and 
how the arisen investigation-of-dhammas awakening factor can be perfected 
by development.

"If the energy awakening factor is present in him, he knows 'there is the 
energy awakening factor in me'; if the energy awakening factor is not pres­
ent in him, he knows 'there is no energy awakening factor in me'; he knows 
how the unarisen energy awakening factor can arise, and how the arisen 
eneTgy awakening factor can be perfected by development,
"If the joy awakening factor is present in him, he knows 'there is the joy 
awakening factor in me'; if the joy awakening factor is not present in him, 
he knows 'there is no joy awakening factor in me'; he knows how the 
unarisen joy awakening factor can arise, and how the arisen joy awakening 
factor can be perfected by development.
"If the tranquillity awakening factor is present in him, he knows 'there is 
the tranquillity awakening factor in me'; if the tranquillity awakening factor 
is not present in him, he knows "there is no tranquillity awakening factor in 
me'; he knows how the unarisen tranquillity awakening factor can arise, 
and how the arisen tranquillity awakening factor can be perfected by 
development.
"If the concentration awakening factor is present in him, he knows'there 
is the concentration awakening factor in me'; if the concentration awaken­
ing factor is not present in him, he knows 'there is no concentration awak­
ening factor in me'; he knows how the unarisen concentration awakening 
factor can arise, and how the arisen concentration awakening factor can be 
perfected by development*
"If the equanimity awakening factor is present in him, he knows 'there is 
the equanimity awakening factor in me'; if the equanimity awakening fac­
tor is not present in him, he knows 'there is no equanimity awakening factor 
in me'; he knows bow the unarisen equanimity awakening factor can arise, 
and how the arisen equanimity awakening factor can be perfected by 
development.

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas inter­
nally 
externally ... internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ,,. of passing away .. *  of both arising and passing away 
in dhammas. Mindfulness that "there are dhammas' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world.
"That is how in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the seven awakening factors.


[NOBLE TRUTHS]
"Again, monks, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the four noble truths- And how does he in regard to dhammas abide 
contemplating dhammas in terms of the four noble truths?
"Here he knows as it really is, 'this is dukkha'; he knows as it really is, 'this 
is the arising of dukkhahe knows as it really is, 'this is the cessation of 
dukkha*} he knows as it really is, 'this is the way leading to the cessation of 
dukkha/

[REFRAIN]
"In this way, in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas inter­
nally ... externally ... internally and externally. He abides contemplating 
the nature of arising ... of passing away ... of both arising and passing away 
in dhammas. Mindfulness that 'there are dhammas' is established in him to 
the extent necessary for bare knowledge and continuous mindfulness. And 
he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world,
"That is how in regard to dhammas he abides contemplating dhammas in 
terms of the four noble truths.

[PREDICTION]
"Monks, if anyone should develop these four satipatthanas in such a way for 
seven years, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowl­
edge here and now, or, if there is a trace of clinging left, non- returning. Let 
alone seven years ... six years ... five years ... four years ... three years ... 
two years ... one year ... seven months ... six months ... five months ... four 
months ... three months ... two months ... one month ... half a month ... if 
anyone should develop these four satipatfhanas in such a way for seven 
days, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge 
here and now, or, if there is a trace of clinging left non-returning. So it was 
with reference to this that it was said:

[DIRECT PATH]
"Monks, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the sur­
mounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of dukkha and 
discontent for acquiring the true method, for the realization of Nibbana, 
namely, the four satipatthanas "
That is what the Blessed One said. The monks were satisfied and 
delighted in the Blessed One's words
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