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Cula-Rahulovada Suttanta (MN147)

posted Jul 10, 2013, 9:41 AM by Sung Yang   [ updated Jul 11, 2013, 4:07 PM ]
Cula-Rahulovada Suttanta (MN147)
(The Shorter Exhortation to Rahula)

Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was staying in the monastery of Anathapindika, in the Jeta Grove, near Savatthi. There the following thought arose in the mind of the Blessed One whilst meditating in solitude:

“Mature are in Rahula those qualities that bring deliverance to maturity. [35] Should I not now give further guidance to Rahula, for the extinction of the corruptions?” [36]

Having robed himself in the forenoon, the Blessed One took bowl and robe, and entered Savatthi for alms. Having gone his round for alms in Savatthi, he returned; and after the meal he addressed the venerable Rahula thus: “Take your mat, Rahula. We shall go to the Andha Grove, and spend the day there.”—“Yes, Lord,” replied the venerable Rahula, took his mat and followed close behind the Blessed One.

On that occasion, many thousands of deities followed the Blessed One, thinking: “Today the Blessed One will give further guidance to the venerable Rahula, for the extinction of the corruptions.”

And the Blessed One, having entered the Andha Grove, sat down at the foot of a certain tree on a seat prepared for him. Then also the venerable Rahula, having saluted the Blessed One respectfully, sat at one side. Thereupon the Blessed One addressed him as follows:

“What do you think, Rahula, is the eye permanent or impermanent?”

“Impermanent, Lord.”

“Is that which is impermanent, painful or pleasant”?

“It is painful Lord.”

“Is it justifiable, then, to think, of that which is impermanent, pain-laden and subject to change—’This is mine;” this I am; [37] this is my self “?’ [38]

“Certainly not, Lord.”

“What do you think, Rahula, are forms (visual objects) permanent or impermanent?”

“Impermanent, Lord.”

“Is that which is impermanent, painful or pleasant?”

“It is painful, Lord.”

“Is it justifiable, then, to think, of that which is impermanent, pain-laden and subject to change—’This is mine; this I am; this is my self ‘? “

“Certainly not, Lord.”

“What do you think, Rahula; are eye-consciousness [39] … visual contact” permanent or impermanent?” “Impermanent, Lord.”

“Is that which is impermanent, painful or pleasant”?

“It is painful Lord.”

“Is it justifiable, then, to think, of that which is impermanent, pain-laden and subject to change—’This is mine; this I am; this is my self “‘?

“Certainly not, Lord.”

“What do you think, Rahula: that which arises conditioned by visual contact, namely all that belongs to feeling, perception, mental formations and consciousness, [40] is that permanent or impermanent?”

“Impermanent, Lord.”

“Is that which is impermanent, painful or pleasant”?

“It is painful, Lord.”

“Is it justifiable, then, to think, of that which is impermanent, pain-laden and subject to change—’This is mine; this I am; this is my self?”’

“Certainly not, Lord.”

“What do you think; Rahula; ear and sounds, nose and smells, tongue and tastes, body and tangibles, mind and ideas: the (corresponding types of) consciousness and contact; and the feelings, perceptions, mental formations and consciousness which arise conditioned by that contact—are all these permanent or impermanent?”

“Impermanent, Lord.”

“Is that which is impermanent, painful or pleasant?”

“It is painful, Lord.”

“Is it justifiable, then, to think, of that which is impermanent, pain-laden and subject to change—’This is mine; this I am; this is my self’?”

“Certainly not, Lord.”

“The learned noble disciple, Rahula, who sees thus, gets, a disgust for the eye, gets a disgust for forms, for visual consciousness, [41] visual contact, [42] and for that which arises conditioned by visual contact, namely all feelings, perceptions, mental formations and consciousness.

“He gets disgust for ear and sounds, nose and smells, tongue and tastes, body and tangibles, mind and ideas, gets a disgust for the (corresponding types of) consciousness and contact, and for that which arises conditioned by that contact, namely all that belongs to feeling, perception, mental formations and consciousness.” [43]

“In him who gets disgusted; [44] passion fades out. [45] With the fading out of passion [46] he is liberated. Thus liberated, the knowledge arises in him: ‘Liberated am I, birth is exhausted, fulfilled is the Holy Life, done what should be done, and nothing further remains after this’: Thus he knows.”

Thus spoke the Blessed One. Glad at heart, the venerable Rahula rejoiced in the words of the Blessed One.

Now during that utterance the mind of the venerable Rahula was freed from the corruptions through clinging no more. And also in those many thousand deities, there arose the stainless, immaculate Eye of Truth [47]: “Whatever is subject to origination is subject to cessation.”

Translation by Nyanaponika Thera, Buddhist Publication Society
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